Steroidal cream

A foreseeable skin emergency for you or someone else in your family is a rash, itchiness, or red, irritated skin. Every family should have 1% hydrocortisone cream in the medicine cabinet just in case. If this over-the-counter, low-dose product isn't effective (and it's often not as fast or successful an antidote as you might need), get a prescription strength version from your dermatologist. It's fantastic for treating a burn (even a sunburn) or any kind of irritation on the skin. You need to have something immediate that you can put on, just like taking aspirin when you have a headache. This is a great antidote for eczema, bug bites, and allergic contact dermatitis (as from poison ivy). But if used on normal, nonrashy skin, topical steroids can lead to stretch marks, so they should only be used temporarily (for a maximum of two weeks).

Why are different strengths critical? The appropriate strength depends on many factors. For example, babies absorb topical steroids faster than adults, so they may require a low-potency steroid. Areas of the body where skin touches skin (think: armpits, rectal area, etc), as well as sensitive areas (like the skin on the eyelids), tend to absorb topical steroids more rapidly, so those regions of the body also usually require a low-potency steroid. However, thick, rough skin on the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet usually absorb topical steroids more slowly than other parts of the body, so those areas typically require a more potent steroid. Keep in mind: The greater the potency of the steroid (in other words, the lower its class number), the more likely it is to cause side effects .

Dr Elliot Shevel is a South African migraine surgery pioneer and the founder and medical director of The Headache Clinic in Johannesburg, Durban and Cape Town, South Africa. The Headache Clinic is a multidisciplinary practice dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of Primary Headaches and Migraines. Dr Shevel is also the main author of all scientific publications generated by his team. He recently won a high level science debate in which he was able to prove that the current migraine diagnosis and classification is not based on data. Tertiary Education - Dr Shevel holds both Dental and Medical degrees, and practises as a specialist Maxillo-facial and Oral Surgeon. Follow the Headache Clinic on Twitter@HeadacheClinic .

You can buy some topical corticosteroids "over-the-counter" without a prescription. For example, for dermatitis, you can buy the steroid cream called hydrocortisone 1% from your pharmacy. Do not apply this to your face unless your doctor has told you to do so. This is because it may trigger a skin condition affecting the face ( acne or rosacea. ) Long-term use may also damage the skin. On your face this would be more noticeable than the rest of your body. So usually only weak steroids are used on the face. Those which are suitable are prescription-only.

Formulations of topical diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, piroxicam, and indomethacin demonstrated significantly higher rates of clinical success (more participants with at least 50% pain relief) than matching topical placebo (moderate or high quality data ). Benzydamine did not. Three drug and formulation combinations had NNTs for clinical success below 4. For diclofenac, the Emulgel® formulation had the lowest NNT of (95% CI to ) in two studies using at least 50% pain intensity reduction as the outcome . Diclofenac plasters other than Flector® also had a low NNT of ( to ) based on good or excellent responses in some studies. Ketoprofen gel had an NNT of ( to ), from five studies in the 1980s, some with less well defined outcomes. Ibuprofen gel had an NNT of ( to ) from two studies with outcomes of marked improvement or complete remission. All other drug and formulation combinations had NNT values above 4, indicating lesser efficacy .

Steroidal cream

steroidal cream

You can buy some topical corticosteroids "over-the-counter" without a prescription. For example, for dermatitis, you can buy the steroid cream called hydrocortisone 1% from your pharmacy. Do not apply this to your face unless your doctor has told you to do so. This is because it may trigger a skin condition affecting the face ( acne or rosacea. ) Long-term use may also damage the skin. On your face this would be more noticeable than the rest of your body. So usually only weak steroids are used on the face. Those which are suitable are prescription-only.

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