Risk-to-benefit ratio of inhaled corticosteroids in patients

Degenerative myopia may be preventable in the future. Today, however, the usual treatments are limited to optical correction, intra-ocular pressure control, and attention to complications that may occur. The use of scleral buckling can prevent axial extension and minimize the toll of myopic macular degeneration on future visual function. At-risk eyes deserve careful evaluation and follow-up, with early treatment where appropriate. New buckling materials are being evaluated for their use in the more severe cases in all age groups. These are eyes in which greater areas of support and stronger buckling forces may be helpful. As always, the safety of any treatment needs to be evaluated in terms of its risk-to-benefit ratio.

In pharmacology , the term ceiling effect refers to the property of increasing doses of a given medication to have progressively smaller incremental effect (an example of diminishing returns ). Mixed agonist-antagonist opioids , such as nalbuphine , serve as a classic example of the ceiling effect; increasing the dose of a narcotic frequently leads to smaller and smaller gains in relief of pain . In many cases, the severity of side effects from a medication increases as the dose increases, long after its therapeutic ceiling has been reached.

Risk-to-benefit ratio of inhaled corticosteroids in patients

risk-to-benefit ratio of inhaled corticosteroids in patients

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risk-to-benefit ratio of inhaled corticosteroids in patientsrisk-to-benefit ratio of inhaled corticosteroids in patientsrisk-to-benefit ratio of inhaled corticosteroids in patientsrisk-to-benefit ratio of inhaled corticosteroids in patientsrisk-to-benefit ratio of inhaled corticosteroids in patients

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