Corticosteroids for dogs

One key natural treatment for Addisons disease in dogs is glandular therapy (GT), which involves using whole animal tissues or extracts of the adrenal gland. GT is used quite often by holistic vets to treat dog patients with autoimmune diseases. In the case of Addison's disease, when the adrenal gland tissues or extracts of the gland is fed to a dog patient, and when these proteins pass through the dog's gut immune tissue, it is thought to desensitize the body's immune response to these proteins, thus calming the body's response to its own similar tissue (in this case, the dog's own adrenal gland). During this process, immune cells are transformed from "attacking" or "inflammatory" cells to "regulatory" cells, which are less reactive.

The growth of children and adolescents receiving orally inhaled corticosteroids, including QVAR, should be monitored routinely (., via stadiometry). If a child or adolescent on any corticosteroid appears to have growth suppression, the possibility that he/she is particularly sensitive to this effect should be considered. The potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against clinical benefits obtained and the risks associated with alternative therapies. To minimize the systemic effects of orally inhaled corticosteroids, including QVAR, each patient should be titrated to his/her lowest effective dose [see Dosage and Administration ( )] .

Corticosteroids for dogs

corticosteroids for dogs

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