Action of steroidal anti inflammatory drugs

Anaphylaxis is life-threatening, but if the correct protocol is followed, it can be effectively treated and dealt with. Anaphylaxis can be of rapid onset, and can deteriorate into a life-threatening emergency very quickly. The patient should be monitored closely, and at the rst sign of any of the following, antivenin should be discontinued, and mg of 1:1000 adrenaline must be administered intramuscularly: urticaria, itching, fever, chills or nrigor, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, tachycardia, hypotension, bronchospasm, and angioedema. Children must be given mg/Kg of body weight adrenaline .

Dysmenorrhoea is a common gynaecological problem consisting of painful cramps accompanying menstruation, which in the absence of any underlying abnormality is known as primary dysmenorrhoea. Research has shown that women with dysmenorrhoea have high levels of prostaglandins, hormones known to cause cramping abdominal pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are drugs that act by blocking prostaglandin production. They inhibit the action of cyclooxygenase (COX), an enzyme responsible for the formation of prostaglandins. The COX enzyme exists in two forms, COX-1 and COX-2. Traditional NSAIDs are considered 'non-selective' because they inhibit both COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. More selective NSAIDs that solely target COX-2 enzymes (COX-2-specific inhibitors) were launched in 1999 with the aim of reducing side effects commonly reported in association with NSAIDs, such as indigestion, headaches and drowsiness.

Action of steroidal anti inflammatory drugs

action of steroidal anti inflammatory drugs

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